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When Felix found himself the possessor of this wonderful book, he set to work to master it, until he knew every bit of it by heart. As he studied it deeply he was more and more impressed with its beauty and sublimity. He could hardly believe that this great work was unknown throughout Germany, since more than a hundred years had passed since it had been written. He determined to do something to arouse people from such apathy. Talking the matter over with musicians and friends, he began to interest them in the plan to study the music of the Passion.

Soon he had secured sixteen good voices, who rehearsed at his home once a week. His enthusiasm fired them to study the music seriously, and before very long they were anxious to give a public performance. There was a splendid choir of nearly four hundred voices conducted by Zelter, at the Singakademie; if he would only lend his chorus to give a trial performance, under Mendelssohn's conducting, how splendid that would be!

But Felix knew that Zelter had no faith in the public taking any interest in Bach, so there was no use asking. This opinion was opposed by one of his little choir, named Devrient, who insisted that Zelter should be approached on the subject.

As he himself had been a pupil of Zelter, he persuaded Mendelssohn to accompany him to the director's house. Zelter was found seated at his instrument, enveloped by a cloud of smoke from a long stemmed pipe. Devrient unfolded the plan of bringing this great work of Bach to the knowledge of the public. The old man listened to their plea with growing impatience, until he became quite excited, rose from his chair and paced the floor with great strides, exclaiming, "No, it is not to be thought of—it is a mad scheme.

Finally, as though a miracle had been wrought, Zelter began to weaken, and at last gave in, and besides promised all the aid in his power. How this youth, not yet twenty, undertook the great task of preparing this masterpiece, and what he accomplished is little short of the marvelous. The public performance, conducted by Mendelssohn, took place March 11, , with every ticket sold and more than a thousand persons turned away.

A second performance was given on March 21, the anniversary of Bach's birth, before a packed house. These performances marked the beginning of a great Bach revival in Germany and England, and the love for this music has never been lost, but increases each year. And now it seemed best for Felix to travel and see something of other countries. He had long wished to visit England, and the present seemed a favorable time, as his friends there assured him of a warm welcome.

The pleasure he felt on reaching London was increased by the enthusiastic greeting he received at the hands of the musical public. He first appeared at a Philharmonic concert on May 25, when his Symphony in C minor was played. The next day he wrote to Fanny: "The success of the concert last night was beyond all I had ever dreamed.

It began with my Symphony. I was led to the desk and received an immense applause. The Adagio was encored, but I went on; the Scherzo was so vigorously applauded that I had to repeat it. After the Finale there was lots more applause, while I was thanking the orchestra and shaking hands, till I left the room. A continual round of functions interspersed with concerts at which he played or conducted, filled the young composer's time. The overture to "Midsummer Night's Dream" was played several times and always received with enthusiasm. On one occasion a friend was so careless as to leave the manuscript in a hackney coach on his way home and it was lost.

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When the London season closed, Mendelssohn and his friend Klingemann went up to Scotland, where he was deeply impressed with the varied beauty of the scenery. Perhaps the Hebrides enthralled him most, with their lonely grandeur. His impressions have been preserved in the Overture to "Fingal's Cave," while from the whole trip he gained inspiration for the Scottish Symphony.

On his return to London and before he could set out for Berlin, Felix injured his knee, which laid him up for several weeks, and prevented his presence at the home marriage of his sister Fanny, to William Hensel, the young painter. This was a keen disappointment to all, but Fanny was not to be separated from her family, as on Mendelssohn's return, he found the young couple had taken up their residence in the Gartenhaus. Mendelssohn had been greatly pleased with his London visit, and though the grand tour he had planned was really only begun, he felt a strong desire to return to England.

However, other countries had to be visited first. The following May he started south, bound for Vienna, Florence and Rome. His way led through Wiemar and gave opportunity for a last visit to Goethe. They passed a number of days in sympathetic companionship. The poet always wanted music, but did not seem to care for Beethoven's compositions, which he said did not touch him at all, though he felt they were great, astonishing. After visiting numerous German cities, Switzerland was reached and its wonderful scenery stirred Mendelssohn's poetic soul to the depths.

Yet, though his passionate love of nature was so impressed by the great mountains, forests and waterfalls, it was the sea which he loved best of all. As he approached Naples, and saw the sea sparkling in the sun lighted bay, he exclaimed: "To me it is the finest object in nature! I love it almost more than the sky. I always feel happy when I see before me the wide expanse of water. Every day he picked out some special object of interest to visit, which made that particular day one never to be forgotten.

The tour lasted until the spring of , before Mendelssohn returned to his home in Berlin, only to leave it shortly afterwards to return to London. This great city, in spite of its fogs, noises and turmoil, appealed to him more than the sunshine of Naples, the fascination of Florence or the beauty of Rome. The comment on Mendelssohn that "he lived years where others only lived weeks," gives a faint idea of the fulness with which his time was occupied. It is only possible to touch on his activities in composition, for he was always at work. The following spring they were married, a true marriage of love and stedfast devotion.

The greatest work of Mendelssohn's career was his oratorio of "Elijah" which had long grown in his mind, until it was on the eve of completion in the spring of In a letter to the famous singer Jenny Lind, an intimate friend, he writes: "I am jumping about my room for joy. If my work turns out half as good as I fancy it is, how pleased I shall be. During these years in which he conceived the "Elijah," his fame had spread widely.

Honors had been bestowed on him by many royalties. The King of Saxony had made him Capellmeister of his Court, and Queen Victoria had shown him many proofs of personal regard, which endeared him more than ever to the country which had first signally recognized his genius. It was Leipsic perhaps which felt the power of his genius most conclusively. The since famous Leipsic Conservatory was founded by him, and he was unceasing in his labors to advance art in every direction.

He also found time to carry out a long cherished plan to erect, at the threshold of the Thomas School, Leipsic, a monument to the memory of Sebastian Bach. Let us take one more glimpse of our beloved composer. It was the morning of August 26, The Town Hall of Birmingham, England, was filled with an expectant throng, for today the composer of the "Elijah" was to conduct his greatest work, for the first time before an English audience. When Mendelssohn stepped upon the platform, he was greeted by a deafening shout; the reception was overwhelming, and at the close the entire audience sprang to its feet in a frenzy of admiration.

He wrote to his brother Paul that evening: "No work of mine ever went so admirably at the first performance, or was received with such enthusiasm both by musicians and public. This visit to England which was to be his last, had used his strength to the limit of endurance, and there was a shadow of a coming breakdown. Soon after he rejoined his family in Frankfort, his sister Fanny suddenly passed away in Berlin.

The news was broken to him too quickly, and with a shriek he fell unconscious to the floor. From this shock he never seemed to rally, though at intervals for a while, he still composed. His death occurred November 4, It can be said of him that his was a beautiful life, in which "there was nothing to tell that was not honorable to his memory and profitable to all men.

Mendelssohn's funeral was imposing. The first portion was solemnized at Leipsic, attended by crowds of musicians and students, one of the latter bearing on a cushion a silver crown presented by his pupils of the Conservatory. The band, during the long procession, played the E minor "Song without Words," and at the close of the service the choir sang the final chorus from Bach's "Passion. The Greatest Music Leaders. Search this site. Arturo Toscanini.

Morgengruß, Op. 47, No. 2: Über die Berge steigt

An die Entfernte, Op. And'res Maienlied Hexenlied , Op. Auf der Wanderschaft, Op. But the Lord is mindful of His own from Saint Paul. Das erste Veilchen, Op. Das Heimweh Fanny Mendelssohn , Op. Der Blumenstrauss, Op. Die Nonne Fanny Mendelssohn , Op. Die Sterne schau'n in stiller Nacht, Op.

Geistliches Lied, Op. Italien Fanny Mendelssohn , Op. Lord God Of Abraham from Elijah. Minnelied im Mai, Op. Sehnsucht Fanny Mendelssohn , Op. Venetianisches Gondellied, Op. Verlust Fanny Mendelssohn , Op. Wartend Romance , Op.

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Wenn sich zwei Herzen scheiden, Op. Woe unto them who forsake Him! Des kleinen Friedrichs Geburtstag, K. Die ihr des unermesslichen Weltalls, K. Die Zufriedenheit, K. Lobegesang auf die feierliche Johannesloge, K. Oiseaux, si tous les ans, K. Verdankt sei es dem Glanz, K. Fac ut portem from Stabat Mater. Quae moerebat from Stabat Mater. Vocalise, Op. Wake, Ye Spirits from Paradise Lost. Four Songs from Gurrelieder arr.

By Berg. Six Orchestral Songs, Op. Am Grabe Anselmos, Op. An Schwager Kronos, Op. Auf dem Wasser zu singen, Op. Ave Maria, Op.

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Dass sei hier gewesen, Op. Dass sie hier gewesen, Op. Du Bist die Ruh, Op.


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Du Liebst mich nicht, Op. Eine altschottische Ballade, Op. Ellens Gesang I, Op. Ellens Gesang II, Op. Flug der Zeit, der, Op. Glaube, Hoffnung und Liebe, Op. Gruppe aus dem Tartarus, Op. Heimliches Lieben, Op. Hin und wieder fliegen Pfeile, Posth. Il modo di prender moglie, Op. Junge Nonne, die, Op. Lachen und Weinen, Op. Liebe hat gelogen, die, Op. Liebende schreibt, die, Op. Liebhaber in allen Gestalten, Posth. Lied der Mignon earlier version No.

Lied der Mignon, Op. Lied eines Schiffers an die Dioskuren , Op. Normanns Gesang, Op. Schlummerlied Schlaflied , Op. Schmetterling, der, Op. Sprache der Liebe, Op. Suleikas zweiter Gesang, Op. Vor meiner Wiege, Op. Wanderer an den Mond, der, Op. Wanderers Nachtlied, Op.

Wandrers Nachtlied, Op. Willkommen und Abeschied, Op. Zur Namensfeier des Herrn Andreas Siller. Liebste, was kann den uns scheiden? Am leuchtenden Sommermorgen A , from Dichterliebe, Op. Am leuchtenden Sommermorgen Bb , from Dichterliebe, Op. Anfangs wollt ich fast verzangen Bm , from Liederkreis, Op.

Auf einer Burg Am , from Liederkreis, Op. Berg' und Burgen schaun herunter F , from Liederkreis, Op. Der Nussbaum Eb , from Myrten, Op. Der Nussbaum F , from Myrten, Op. Die Lotosblume Db , from Myrten, Op. Die Lotosblume Eb , from Myrten, Op. Die Stille F , from Liederkreis, Op. Die Stille G , from Liederkreis, Op. Du bist wie eine Blume E , from Myrten, Op. Du bist wie eine Blume Gb , from Myrten, Op. Es treibt mich hin Am , from Liederkreis, Op. Freisinn Eb , from Myrten, Op. From: Songbook for the Young, Op. Hauptmanns Weib Cm , from Myrten, Op. Hauptmanns Weib Dm , from Myrten, Op.

Hinaus ins Freie! Ich grolle nicht C , from Dichterliebe, Op. Ich hab im Traum geweinet C m , from Dichterliebe, Op. Ich hab im Traum geweinet Ebm , from Dichterliebe, Op. Ich kann's nicht fassen Bbm , from Frauenliebe und Leben, Op. Ich kann's nicht fassen Cm , from Frauenliebe und Leben, Op. Ich will meine Seele tauchen Am , from Dichterliebe, Op. Ich will meine Seele tauchen Gm , from Dichterliebe, Op. Im Walde A , from Liederkreis, Op. Im Walde G , from Liederkreis, Op. Im Westen D , from Myrten, Op. Im Westen Eb , from Myrten, Op. In der Fremde Em , from Liederkreis, Op.

In der Fremde F m , from Liederkreis, Op. Am Grabe Anselmos, Op. An Schwager Kronos, Op. Auf dem Wasser zu singen, Op. Ave Maria, Op. Dass sei hier gewesen, Op. Dass sie hier gewesen, Op. Du Bist die Ruh, Op. Du Liebst mich nicht, Op. Eine altschottische Ballade, Op. Ellens Gesang I, Op.

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Ellens Gesang II, Op. Flug der Zeit, der, Op. Glaube, Hoffnung und Liebe, Op. Gruppe aus dem Tartarus, Op. Heimliches Lieben, Op. Hin und wieder fliegen Pfeile, Posth. Il modo di prender moglie, Op. Junge Nonne, die, Op. Lachen und Weinen, Op. Liebe hat gelogen, die, Op. Liebende schreibt, die, Op. Liebhaber in allen Gestalten, Posth. Lied der Mignon earlier version No. Lied der Mignon, Op. Lied eines Schiffers an die Dioskuren , Op. Normanns Gesang, Op. Schlummerlied Schlaflied , Op.

Schmetterling, der, Op. Sohn des Vaters from Stabat Mater. Sprache der Liebe, Op. Suleikas zweiter Gesang, Op. Vor meiner Wiege, Op. Wanderer an den Mond, der, Op. Wanderers Nachtlied, Op. Wandrers Nachtlied, Op. Willkommen und Abeschied, Op. Zur Namensfeier des Herrn Andreas Siller. Liebste, was kann den uns scheiden?

Am leuchtenden Sommermorgen A , from Dichterliebe, Op. Am leuchtenden Sommermorgen Bb , from Dichterliebe, Op. Anfangs wollt ich fast verzangen Bm , from Liederkreis, Op. Auf einer Burg Am , from Liederkreis, Op. Der Nussbaum Eb , from Myrten, Op. Der Nussbaum F , from Myrten, Op. Die Lotosblume Db , from Myrten, Op. Die Lotosblume Eb , from Myrten, Op. Die Stille F , from Liederkreis, Op.

Die Stille G , from Liederkreis, Op. Du bist wie eine Blume E , from Myrten, Op. Du bist wie eine Blume Gb , from Myrten, Op. Es treibt mich hin Am , from Liederkreis, Op. Freisinn Eb , from Myrten, Op. From: Songbook for the Young, Op. Hauptmanns Weib Cm , from Myrten, Op. Hauptmanns Weib Dm , from Myrten, Op. Hinaus ins Freie! Ich grolle nicht C , from Dichterliebe, Op. Ich hab im Traum geweinet C m , from Dichterliebe, Op. Ich hab im Traum geweinet Ebm , from Dichterliebe, Op.

Ich will meine Seele tauchen Am , from Dichterliebe, Op. Ich will meine Seele tauchen Gm , from Dichterliebe, Op. Im Walde A , from Liederkreis, Op. Im Walde G , from Liederkreis, Op. Im Westen D , from Myrten, Op. Im Westen Eb , from Myrten, Op. In der Fremde Em , from Liederkreis, Op. In der Fremde F m , from Liederkreis, Op. In der Fremde Gm , from Liederkreis, Op.

Intermezzo F , from Liederkreis, Op. Intermezzo G , from Liederkreis, Op. Liebesbotschaft Eb , from Sechs Gedichte, Op. Lied der Suleika F , from Myrten, Op. Lied der Suleika G , from Myrten, Op. C , from From: Minnespiel, Op. Mondnacht B , from Liederkreis, Op. Mondnacht Db , from Liederkreis, Op. Morgens steh ich auf und frage C , from Liederkreis, Op. O Freund, mein Schirm, mein Schutz! Gm , from From: Minnespiel, Op. Seit ich ihn gesehen Ab , from Frauenliebe und Leben, Op. Seit ich ihn gesehen Bb , from Frauenliebe und Leben, Op. Stirb, Lieb und Freud! Talismane Bb , from Myrten, Op.

Talismane C , from Myrten, Op. Bb , from Sieben Lieder, Op. Warnung Am , from Drei Gedichte, Op. Warte, warte, wilder Schiffmann C , from Liederkreis, Op. F , from Myrten, Op. G , from Myrten, Op. Was woll ich sagen?

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Wehmut D , from Liederkreis, Op. Wehmut E , from Liederkreis, Op. Weit, weit Em , from Myrten, Op. Weit, weit Fm , from Myrten, Op. Wenn ich in deine Augen seh D , from Dichterliebe, Op. Wenn ich in deine Augen seh F , from Dichterliebe, Op. Wer machte dich so krank? Widmung Gb , from Myrten, Op.