Download e-book 7 Easy Ways To Go Plastic Free: Don’t Settle For BPA-Free Plastic Containers

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Plastic Oceans has a new film, and education and discussion guide, for youth, ages 5 to The goal is to teach as many young people worldwide about the harm of single-use plastic, and to inspire the next generation to find solutions to our global reliance on plastic. Details and sign-up forms to screen the film, and use the education and discussion guide, are available on the Plastic Oceans website at PlasticOceans. Changing habits may be difficult, but schoolchildren have proven it is possible.

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There is no Planet B, and we must treat it as such by working together to ensure a healthy environment now and for generations to come. Join us in the fight to end plastic pollution to protect our global environment and future.

One Quick and Easy Step to Making your Frozen Meal that Much Healthier - Because Health

Julie has worked in public health and nonprofit management internationally for the past 15 years in the US, Japan, Hong Kong and Thailand. Her career has focused on the effective communication of information regarding new means of improving and safeguarding human health, as well as the environment, against the negative effects of industrial development. Julie was raised in San Diego, where the ocean was part of her daily lifestyle as a swimmer and triathlete.

As Global Executive Director of the Plastic Oceans Foundation, Julie combines her education and career in the life sciences with her love of the ocean. Our International School Parent magazine is free to read online or download on your computer, tablet or smartphone.

Check out the latest editions. Long-Term Plastic vs.

In Feast of Data on BPA Plastic, No Final Answer

Single-Use Plastic In many ways, plastic is a good product, which makes our lives more enjoyable and affordable. Microplastics: A Big Problem Our cultural habit of frequently using disposable products has created a societal reliance on throw-away plastic that is strangling the environment. Plastic Facts: More than one million plastic bottles are bought every minute. An estimated one trillion plastic bags are used every year. One trillion plastic bags is the equivalent of having the contents of a large waste truck being dumped into the ocean every minute.

It kills sea life, fouls waterways and beaches, and leads to harmful chemicals reaching the human food chain.

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The Particular Harm in Styrofoam-Made Containers Compounding the plastic pollution epidemic, plastics absorb free-floating chemicals in the ocean, so when microplastics enter the food chain, the additionally absorbed toxins settle into the muscles and fat of fish, which is the part we mainly eat. These are only a few of many hazardous chemicals used to give plastics different properties. Parents Have the Power to Affect Change The campaign against smoking required global change in how societies perceived smoking, educated children about negative hazards, implemented policies banning advertisements targeting kids, and set age limits to purchase cigarettes.

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Recommendations: Refuse single-use plastic. Replace straws, plastic bags, and plastic water bottles with reusable. Heating plastic releases harmful toxins. Encourage kids to get involved finding alternative plastic-free snacks. Bananas and oranges already have their own packaging!


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Encourage schools to stop selling water bottles and install water refilling stations. Encourage schools to implement plastic-free policies. Youth Always Leads the Way The problem can seem overwhelming, but it is solvable.

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New Film to Educate Youth Worldwide Plastic Oceans has a new film, and education and discussion guide, for youth, ages 5 to Read more articles here. Share now. Read More.

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International School of Berne Berne, Switzerland. Planning for IB success. Discovering Hospitality on Your Doorstep. How your child can avoid the summer slide — 7 top tips for parents. For any plastics that fit the description of being hard, clear or clear-tinted and unbreakable, flip them over and look for a recycling number. Look to see if the container is labeled as unbreakable or microwave-safe.

Get rid of it. Metal containers, especially aluminum water bottles, are sometimes lined in BPA to improve the taste of the water. If you feel any plastic lining inside a container that isn't marked as BPA-free, it's best to throw it away. These types of linings are especially prone to scratching. Worn containers pose a higher leaching risk.